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Current Projects

The 2 projects detailed below have come to an end and we are currently working to finalise all the reporting linked with the projects. Both projects were successful in their aim of working with landholders to maintain and improve ecosystem linkages within the CCG area. A more lengthy update on the project outcomes will be posted soon.

‘Restoring ecological linkages in the Margaret River’

 This project which is funded by the federal government through its ‘Caring for our Country’ program involves working with landholders within the rural or agricultural portion of the Margaret river catchment with the overall aim of:

  • Protecting critical habitat and remnant vegetation;
  • Restoring and improving ecosystem function and linkages (particularly through waterways);

 The project aims to achieve this by providing landholders with technical and financial support in undertaking priority on ground projects that contribute to landscape scale conservation.

Projects have been identified and prioritised based on previous work in the catchment over the past 10 years and through the preparation of 40 biodiversity management plans covering the strategic private properties within the target area. These properties either:

  • Contain significant patches of remnant vegetation;
  • Important waterway or riparian areas; or
  • Provide linkage areas between key habitat areas.

 The plans prepared through this project identify and prioritise actions to benefit the conservation and catchment values of the properties. These recommendations then guide the provision of financial assistance for the on-ground works.

 Financial assistance is available for the following activities:

  • Fencing to exclude stock from riparian areas;
  • Fencing to exclude stock from remnant vegetation ;
  • Control of priority environmental weeds;
  • Priority revegetation;
  • Dieback testing, mapping and treatment; and
  • Feral animal control.

 For more information on this project call the CCG on 9757 2202.

Implementing the Augusta-Margaret River landscape Conservation Action Plan’ 

This project which is funded by the South West Catchments Council and the federal government through its ‘Caring for our Country’ program focuses on implementing key elements of the Augusta Margaret River Landscape Conservation Action Plan with a particular focus on the Leeuwin Naturaliste ridge and strategic private properties within the ridge.

This project involves:

  • Completion of the Augusta Margaret River landscape Conservation Action Plan summary document;
  • Progressive implementation of high priority elements within the CAP document;
  • Engaging landholders of strategic properties through the Leeuwin Naturaliste Ridge;
  • Providing technical and financial support for strategic on ground action across the Leeuwin Naturaliste Ridge. 

On-ground projects have been identified and prioritised based on the preparation of 30 biodiversity management plans for strategic private properties within 5 key nodes along the Leeuwin Naturaliste ridge. These nodes were chosen because they represent clusters of large private holdings of bushland – they collectively contribute significantly to the Leeuwin Naturaliste corridor and the Leeuwin Naturaliste National Park.  

The five nodes where on ground work is currently being focused are:

  • Gracetown;
  • Kilcarnup – Ellensbrook;
  • Calgardup – Redgate;
  • Hamelin – Foul Bay; and
  • Hillview Ave, Augusta. 

Financial assistance is available for the following activities:

  • Control of priority environmental weeds;
  • Dieback testing, mapping and treatment; and
  • Feral animal control. 

For more information on this project call the CCG on 9757 2202.

 

Still Wanted…. black-gloved wallaby sightings.  

The CCG are still happy to receive any black-gloved wallaby sightings you may have. See below for more info.

 

 

The black gloved wallaby is the second largest native mammal in the south west of WA but we know very little about it.  We know that it does best in large areas of bush with good understorey, but we do not know how it moves across the landscape, and official records are scarce.  The black gloved wallaby (also known as the western brush wallaby, Macropus irma), has been identified as a key conservation target in our area.

We need your help to increase our knowledge of the distribution and habitat of this important mammal.  This information will be used in conserving black gloved wallabies into the future.

 What do they look like?

The black gloved wallaby is gunmetal grey in colour with a brownish tinge to the neck and back, which is very slightly banded; the chest is grey and the belly buff.  It has a distinct white facial stripe; the ears are blackish outside and whitish within and have a clear black tip. They have distinct black gloves and toes. The tail is long and has a black brush at the end. Males and females are the same size, with head and body length of about 1.2 m.

The black-gloved wallaby can be distinguished from western grey kangaroo by the distinctive black ears, white facial stripe and much shorter forelimbs. Their hopping style is also distinct from the upright gait of the western greykangaroo; the head remains low and the tail is extended.

If you know of areas in which you have seen these wallabies (on your property, at night while driving, as road kill etc.), please provide as much information as possible at this link including your phone number, precise description of the location, date and time of sighting we will then follow up with you for more information. Go to the contacts page to send us your sightings or phone the office on 9757 2202.

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